The Human Condition: Mental Health Explored

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The Human Condition: Mental Health Explored

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The human brain is truly a marvel of human development. With its capabilities being so advanced that we as a species can hardly fathom their existence, but marvelous doesn’t mean flawless.

In previous entries to this column, I have discussed my personal affinity to the topics involving the brain and its mechanisms, but one thing that hasn’t been referenced is the brain’s flaws and possible shortcomings. The physiological fallacies of the chemistry and structure of the brain are widely unknown. With little true understanding of mental conditions relating to the literal makeup of the brain, the various conditions and maladies plaguing so many individuals throughout the world are often misunderstood or even overlooked entirely.

My best piece of advice would be to not allow yourself to deal with these problems alone, there are those that care and those with your well being in mind. Don’t give any power or opportunity to such a serious and possibly manageable illness.”

I suffer from bipolar disorder, a mental illness characterized by episodes of often extreme mood swings that can endure for weeks to months of time. These shifts in mood are generally quite drastic in nature depending on the severity of the illness’s diagnosis, ranging from hypomania which is lesser in severity than normally seen in manic episodes to major depressive episodes that can be described as severe depression, hopelessness, misery and suicidal ideation.

Today, 20 percent of all youth (age 13-18) live with some form of mental illness. With suicide being the third leading cause of death among the age group of 13-24, I personally feel it is safe to say that mental health and all of its potential problems can be deemed an epidemic.

Mental health is one hundred percent one of the most integral aspects of anyone’s life, without mental stability, how can we conduct our day-to-day responsibilities let alone hold ourselves accountable for our own general well being? The answer is really that we can’t, not consistently at least, anyone who knows of the drastic repercussions of deteriorating or untreated mental conditions would likely agree.

Nothing is hopeless however, while nobody can expect the very best from themselves or even others suffering from a mental illness, effort is truly what matters. Waking up each day and, as cliche as it seems, putting your best foot forward makes a huge difference in any situation, especially so in the case of those with chronic mental health problems.

Those currently being treated for their own illness, those who know individuals going through mental illness or even those who suffer without treatment or knowledge of their own mental condition, please seek out help of some kind. There is no time better than right now to make efforts toward your own recovery. I hope to create an environment of understanding among my readers, one of hope and of acceptance of the real world scenarios and situations so many are put into each and every day.

Don’t allow your mental health to control you. You are not your illness and there are outlets to seek in order to improve the conditions of any mental health related problem. Talk to the people close to you if possible about your thoughts and emotions when they aren’t the best, seek out professional medical treatment and counseling if need be. These steps can be as simple as making a phone call to a local mental health agency or healthcare professional’s office, or even texting a friend or talking to a family member.

My best piece of advice would be to not allow yourself to deal with these problems alone, there are those that care and those with your well being in mind. Don’t give any power or opportunity to such a serious and possibly manageable illness. If someone has an illness involving their heart or lungs, I would imagine they would be quick to seek any treatment for it possible, the brain should be no different.

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