FFA Members Meet PA’s Veterinarian of the Year

Dr. Philip Aquadro of Warriors Mark gave the students a tour of his facility and described his career.

FFA+member+Brody+Rizzo+raises+his+hand+to+answer+questions+from+Dr.+Aquadro+%28right%29+during+the+tour+of+the+exam+room+at+Town+and+Country+Animal+Hospital+in+Warriors+Mark
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FFA Members Meet PA’s Veterinarian of the Year

FFA member Brody Rizzo raises his hand to answer questions from Dr. Aquadro (right) during the tour of the exam room at Town and Country Animal Hospital in Warriors Mark

FFA member Brody Rizzo raises his hand to answer questions from Dr. Aquadro (right) during the tour of the exam room at Town and Country Animal Hospital in Warriors Mark

Tiffany Hoy

FFA member Brody Rizzo raises his hand to answer questions from Dr. Aquadro (right) during the tour of the exam room at Town and Country Animal Hospital in Warriors Mark

Tiffany Hoy

Tiffany Hoy

FFA member Brody Rizzo raises his hand to answer questions from Dr. Aquadro (right) during the tour of the exam room at Town and Country Animal Hospital in Warriors Mark

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Tyrone Area FFA members shadowed the Pennsylvania Veterinary Medical Association’s “2019 Veterinarian of the Year,” Dr. Philip Aquadro at Town and Country Animal Hospital in Warriors Mark on Monday, September 30. 

Aquadro completed his undergraduate studies at Penn State, and received his veterinary degree from Cornell University in 1988.  His interests include all aspects of mixed animal practice, with special interests in ruminant medicine and surgery, dairy herd health, and small animal surgery.

“Veterinary medicine requires great focus and time commitment,” said Aquadro, “It can be a very rewarding career, but many students don’t realize they aren’t just working with animals.”

Veterinary medicine requires great focus and time commitment. It can be a very rewarding career, but many students don’t realize they aren’t just working with animals”

— Dr. Philip Aquadro

Town and Country Animal Hospital is a full service veterinary practice with two examination rooms, a surgery suite, in-house radiology, comprehensive in-house laboratory, isolation facility, and boarding facilities. The practice also has two mobile farm veterinary units that provide on-farm medical and surgical care for all species of animals.

Aquadro first took the group through the examination rooms and kennel area. The kennel area consisted of various pens with cats. dogs and other small animals either waiting for or recovering from treatment. The pharmacy is located nearby and consisted of multiple shelves full of medications and treatments for all species of animals.

“[The tour] was very fun and interactive,” said sophomore Randi Williams, “I learned a lot about veterinary technology and procedures.”

Junior Libby Buck was also impressed, but surprised to learn the level of commitment that it takes to become a veterinarian.

“I just think the time commitment with education and expenses, plus some other aspects of the profession are not for me,” said Buck.

Following the kennel and pharmacy the group got to see the ultrasound and x-ray rooms. Aquadro showed the members videos from previous ultrasounds such as a calf inside its mother and kidney stone in a dog. The isolation room followed and Dr. Aquadro explained that this was where certain contagious animals would go to prevent other animals from getting sick.

[The tour] showed me how I can have a successful career in agriculture and how the agriculture field has many opportunities in it other than just farming”

— Sophomore Grace Peterson

“[The tour] showed me how I can have a successful career in agriculture and how the agriculture field has many opportunities in it other than just farming,” said sophomore Grace Peterson.

The last, and one of the most popular, part of the tour was Dr. Aquadro’s truck, which he refers to as “his hospital on wheels.”

The mobile unit had a large compartment in the bed that is insulated, heated, and cooled. The compartment contained supplies from medications to disinfectant supplies, to hoof trimmers, to the materials necessary to perform on-site surgery.

Aquadro concluded the tour with a discussion of some of the unusual procedures he performed in his career, such as removing an entire toothpick from a small dog. He also gave a small talk on the career of a veterinarian and what all it entitles such as schooling, necessary skills, and work character.

“I really enjoyed the job shadow. It was a great experience that showed me much more of what goes into the vet career,” said junior Whisper Breon.

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