FFA Attends Ag Safety Expo and Penn State

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FFA Attends Ag Safety Expo and Penn State

Tiffany Hoy

Tiffany Hoy

Tiffany Hoy

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A group of Tyrone FFA students recently traveled to Penn State University College of Agricultural Sciences for the second annual Ag Safety Expo on February 22 at the PSU Ag Arena.

Tyrone Area High School students enrolled in the Agricultural Power and Technology, Leadership and Communication, and Agricultural Animal Sciences courses, along with the FFA chapter officers took part in the 11 different demonstration and displays.

The day focused on safety and career options in the many fields of agriculture.

The information session really made me think more about my future.  It changed my idea of agriculture because it has many advantages in the program at Penn State”

— Tyrone senior Bree Weaver

“The information session really made me think more about my future.  It changed my idea of agriculture because it has many advantages in the program at Penn State,” said Tyrone senior Bree Weaver.

The focus on Ag safety is important as agriculture consistently ranks among the most hazardous occupations, with high rates of injuries and fatalities, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. In 2016 alone, there were 417 farmers and farm workers who died from a work-related injury in the United States.

The leading causes of deaths in this industry, such as machinery- and animal-related accidents, are largely preventable with proper instruction, noted Michael Pate, Professor of Agricultural Safety and Health in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering.

“Often times, it boils down to an unsafe act or an unsafe condition,” said Pate. “People can be educated to avoid unsafe acts and how to avoid or improve unsafe conditions.”

The morning bagan with a welcome address and then lead into the following activities: ATV Rollover and Tilt Table Demonstration, Tractor Safety Strategies, Large Animal Rescue Simulation, Flowing Grain Hazard, Chainsaw Safety and PSU Woodsman Team demonstration, Pesticide Education, Corn Harvest Hazard Simulator, Fire Extinguisher Simulator, Head, Eye, and Foot Protection, Farm Hazard Hunt Display, and AgriAbility.

The students then had a break at the Penn State Creamery to enjoy lunch and some of their famous ice cream.

They then proceeded to the Agricultural Science Industry (ASI) building to meet with Penn State official Derek James about different  major and minors in the College of Agricultural Sciences.

“I am interested in vet tech, animal science, food science, and biological engineering.  I liked how he [Derek James] told us different things.  It changed my view with what studies are considered agricultural,” said sophomore Carissa Hamp.

Penn State has earned a reputation as a leader in agriculture, Pate noted.

“People look toward Penn State and Penn State Extension to provide the research and applied knowledge to help them be successful in their endeavors,” said Pate.

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